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What Are the Most Common Premature Ejaculation Symptoms?
October 14, 2017

What Are the Most Common Premature Ejaculation Symptoms?

premature ejaculation symptoms

Have you been diagnosed with premature ejaculation? Yeah right! Now that’s the kind of doctor you DON’T want. A guy who would tell you, “Hey buddy, your wife/girlfriend says you’re not lasting long enough.” Yikes! The truth is, no one’s going to actually tell you that you don’t last long enough or that you have premature ejaculation symptoms.

A doctor certainly can’t tell just by looking at you. Contrary to popular belief, not all men who are out of shape have erectile problems. Just look at Ron Jeremy! Not a physically fit guy, stayed hard for decades, right? (Or supposedly he did, it’s not like we collect all of his movies or anything)

Your partner is probably not going to tell you that you have PE—in fact, she might not even KNOW that you have a problem. How so? Don’t all women know if their man is not lasting long enough? Not necessarily.

If your partner wants you to last longer in penetration and enjoys the feeling of an erect penis inside her, then she will urge you on to keep going and to keep the momentum up. But if you can’t hold it and come too soon, or if you always change positions just as it starts to feel good for her, then she’s just going to assume that you (or maybe all guys!) just aren’t built to last that long.

Maybe she’s thinking, “Oh well it’s not like porn is real, right? Maybe that’s a problem all guys have.”

Well isn’t that a shame? If only the two of you knew that there are techniques you can pursue and PE training that can make a man last longer—even beyond the standard 5-7 minutes. You can please your partner and last longer, as long as she needs to orgasm or have multiple orgasms. All that’s required is a commitment to trying to new things and communicating with each other for the best results.

To begin, let’s talk about symptoms of premature ejaculation so that you understand the difference between clinical PE, everyday PE and what “staying power” really means.

Premature Ejaculation Symptoms

To start, the symptoms of PE simply involve you losing control over your ejaculation. You want to last longer, your brain feels it, you desire it, but your penis doesn’t get the message! You ejaculate regardless of how much you try to hold it in. Maybe you try to change positions, but even after doing so, the urge to immediately come doesn’t go away.

Yeah, it’s frustrating for you and for your partner if she wants more vaginal penetration. Where it gets confusing however, is to determine whether you actually have premature ejaculation, the clinical definition, or are just an average man who wants more stamina.

While PE only affects one man in every ten, staying power is a universal problem that every man struggles with. Barry White even sung about Staying Power, that’s how important a problem it is—it’s part of American culture.

Clinical symptoms of PE, as WebMD explains, are when the man can’t penetrate a vagina for over two minutes, or possibly within one minute. His body is so oversensitive that normal penetration (with a five minute standard among all men) is impossible. What many people don’t realize is that men with PE usually have to ejaculate with only minimal sexual stimulation.

Some guys think they have premature ejaculation symptoms just because they go five minutes and then start to weaken. This is contrast to men who literally go 10-120 seconds and ejaculate—regardless of how much they want to control it. Some men literally come within seconds of penetrating a vagina or even fondling a woman’s breast. This would be considered clinical PE.

Now PE can also exist colloquially speaking, as in a man who comes too soon before he’s ready and before his partner wants him to come, resulting in frustration and unsatisfying sex. This may not be a clinical condition but it’s still a real problem since it causes stress and anxiety.

PE diagnosis typically comes after a conversation with a doctor who wants to know a man’s history. He may do a physical exam and may order lab tests if he suspects a physical dysfunction or drug interaction may be the cause, or perhaps if the symptoms also suggest erectile dysfunction which could imply heart trouble.

Common Reasons for PE Symptoms

Unlike ED, diagnosis for PE doesn’t come easy since there are many common reasons for symptoms as well as more complex psychological symptoms which require more study and more psychological testing. For example, if we’re talking about staying power then it’s actually quite common for single men to ejaculate and orgasm after reasonable penetration time simply because he has a new sexual partner and is highly attracted to her.

Many men think of porn as some sort of universal standard, when it’s actually more like a cartoon. Most men don’t pound away at a woman’s vagina for 45 minutes and even if a porn star is capable of going that long, his reputation is helped by creative camera editing. (I know, sorry to destroy the illusion but even the stallions of porn accidentally ejaculate too soon just like the rest of us. They just edit that part out!)

Some men have problems with PE because of performance anxiety, life anxiety, depression, guilt (relationship or religious guilt) and in very rare cases, it may involve a hormonal imbalance.

A source at NetDoctor states that PE may result from biological reasons. In theory, males with PE are able to impregnate females with ease, compared to a male who has delayed ejaculation. Genetically, a father may also pass ejaculation endurance down to his son.

But for the most part, what we know as premature coming happens simply because men have not been taught the art of staying power.

Staying Power—How to Unlearn the Fast “Jerk Off”

The idea of men training themselves to come too soon is so common it’s actually referred to as “lifelong premature ejaculation”, vs. situational or general PE. General PE suggests temporary problems, whether physical or psychological. Lifelong PE problems suggest the problem has always been the man’s pattern in masturbating and or making love.

Boys learn to masturbate in their early teens and make a habit out of ejaculating quickly to avoid parents and to play along with the fast-paced porn they see.

A man must then un-learn his masturbation style and or sexual routines in order to last longer. He has trained his body to come quickly and now must stop doing the same sequences of sexual foreplay and penetration. According to one medical source, sex therapy is the solution, whether administered in office or simply by taking the same strategies and trying them as a couple. Even in therapy, the doctor strongly advises both partners to be present for sessions.

If the couple decides to try strategies without professional guidance, the strategy is the same. They might be advised to eliminate orgasm and ejaculation as a goal of sex and refocus their minds and bodies on physical touching and longer sessions of foreplay. This “sensate focus” technique teaches both partners how to slow down and get away from the more common “hard and fast” approach to sex that porn and Hollywood sex scenes seem to promote.

Another technique used in therapy is that of the Masters and Johnson squeeze, which sees the man’s partner use firm pressure to squeeze the bottom of the penis head with a thumb and forefinger. This stops ejaculation physically by blocking the urethral passage. The start and stop technique simply involves the man spending more time in foreplay or self-touching so that he learns his own personal “point of no return”. He spends more time in a lower level of excitement, gradually builds up the intensity and then stops before the point of ejaculation is imminent.

Another technique that has proven effective is having more than one session of sex. If the man ejaculates early the first time, he may be able to last longer after developing another erection. If he has a long refractory period (the time needed to become erect after ejaculating) he may try masturbating hours in advance. A shorter refractory period means he may actually be able to ejaculate twice in the same 20-60 minute time frame.

Radical Options for Treating Symptoms of Premature Ejaculation

Some men will discover that an educational approach to solving PE doesn’t work. This may be because of penis sensitivity or even due to serious health issues like erectile dysfunction, suggesting heart disease, or angina.

medication and PE symptoms

In this case, two prescription medications often recommended to sufferers include SSRI antidepressants and Viagra. Anti-depressants, such as Sertraline or Paroxetine, can actually cause delayed ejaculation in users, which would be a beneficial “side effect” for men who have too much sensitivity. Viagra can be used to reduce the refractory or recovery period that follows a man’s first ejaculation.

There are also topical solutions that can temporarily numb penis sensitivity, such as lidocaine and prilocaine. Some of these creams are included in “desensitizing” condoms, and work with the “extra thick” material to promote staying power.

The Hard Truth About Staying Power

When it comes to men who want to go “beyond average” (which is typically cited as five minutes but may sometimes be over seven minutes according to some polls) there is a simple rule of thumb for conquering “too soon” ejaculation: Figure out how long you NEED to last to make your partner happy.

The idea of a man hammering away at a woman for an hour or longer just isn’t realistic. Most women will either tire out at a reasonable point or may even feel sore at the constant friction.

According to a GQ article which polled women about staying power and other sexual issues, 7-13 minutes was considered “desirable” but 10-30 minutes was “too long”. Furthermore, couples averaged 11-13 minutes for foreplay but 7-8 minutes of intercourse. The article also reiterated the fact that many women are not able to orgasm every time they have sex.

That means that if a woman feels sexually inhibited, a man pounding away at her vagina for hours cannot force her to orgasm. It just won’t happen. Together with the fact that some women can’t have vaginal orgasms without clitoral stimulation, we see the flaw of the argument. You as a man cannot force a woman to orgasm. She has to want it to happen and the circumstances have to be right.

Many women also experience their own version of performance anxiety. They stress about not being able to orgasm on command or at the “perfect time” and psyche themselves out just like men do about their own genitals. If a woman has a mental block, then there’s a good reason why she’s not responding.

This indicates that it’s far more important than a man create an ideal environment than focus too much on raw staying power. If the environment is right, then the next logical step is that a man spend more time with foreplay or “outercourse” so that when penetration comes next, the woman is already wet, excited and orgasmic. If a woman wants to orgasm and feels comfortable enough to surrender to the feeling, then clitoral stimulation should accompany penetration, whether before, during or after.

Simply put, if a woman isn’t satisfied sexually, staying power is the least of a man’s worries. Find out the root cause and then premature ejaculation symptoms become secondary. Find out how long she wants you to last and what positions are best for reaching the G-spot or deeper. Find out when clitoral stimulation is most effective, based not only on what she asks you do, but how she reacts when you do it. You will both explore different ideas for improving staying power and your efficient back and forth communication will be what brings you success.

Sources

http://www.webmd.com/men/tc/premature-ejaculation-topic-overview#1 http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/conditions/sexual-health/a2233/premature-ejaculation/ http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/435884-overview https://www.gq.com/story/how-long-should-sex-last-self

Mark Meyers

Mark is founder and sexcoach at Sexual Improvements. "Anyone can have an awesome sexlife with the right information!"

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